Tom’s Carnivores

If you've just returned from the garden centre with your first flytrap, or are looking for an easy-to-grow carnivorous plant as a unusual gift, this is for you!

New to carnivorous plants? Start here!

Whether you’ve just returned from the garden centre with your first Venus flytrap, or are simply looking for an easy-to-grow carnivorous plant as a unusual gift, you’re in the right place.

On this page I’ve included answers to the most common questions, links to essential growing guides, and suggestions for beginner-friendly gifts.

Contents

  1. What kinds of carnivorous plant are there?
  2. Which carnivorous plants are good for beginners?
  3. How do I care for my Venus flytrap, Cape Sundew, or Purple Pitcher Plant?
  4. Where can I find detailed care instructions?
  5. Where can I buy carnivorous plants?
  6. Where can I get carnivorous plant seeds?
  7. Where can I get purified water?
  8. Which carnivorous plant blogs and forums should I follow?

1. What kinds of carnivorous plant are there?

The Venus Flytrap: Without a doubt the most famous carnivorous plant, the Venus flytrap is - for many growers - a gateway drug! The speed at which a healthy plant will snap shut on an insect is amazing the first time you witness it. There is only one species - Dionaea muscipula - but dozens of weird and wonderful varieties are available.

The Sundews: There are almost 200 species of Sundew (Drosera). They vary enormously in size, shape, and growing requirements, and can be found on every continent on Earth except Antarctica. Most are covered with tentacles which have brightly-coloured, glue-covered tips. These tentacles can move, helping the Sundew to quickly suffocate and digest insects which have become stuck.

The Butterworts: You can find Butterworts (Pinguicula) throughout the Northern Hemisphere, with the highest concentration being found in Mexico and Central America. There are around 100 species in all. Their leaves normally appear green and glossy, growing in a ground-hugging rosette. They are also known as flypaper traps, on account of the sticky leaves they use to catch gnats and fruit flies.

From left to right, a Venus flytrap, a Sundew, and a Butterwort. Courtesy of the ICPS.
From left to right, a Venus flytrap, a Sundew, and a Butterwort. Courtesy of the ICPS.

The Pitcher Plants: Pitcher plants typically feature leaves shaped like tubes or vases. Insects slip on the pitcher rim and fall into the digestive enzymes below. There are actually five different kinds (or ‘genera’) of pitcher plant - their common and scientific names are listed below.

In garden centers, you’re most likely to encounter the first two: Sarracenia and Nepenthes. For care advice, keep reading!

The pitcher plants, clockwise from top left: Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Nepenthes, Cephalotus, Darlingtonia. Courtesy of the ICPS.
The pitcher plants, clockwise from top left: Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Nepenthes, Cephalotus, Darlingtonia. Courtesy of the ICPS.

The Bladderworts: With over 200 species, the Bladderworts (Utricularia) are another hugely diverse genus of canivorous plant. Found almost everywhere on Earth, Bladderworts capture prey using bladder-like organs on their roots, which are submerged underwater. Tiny organisms (such as water fleas) are sucked into the bladders in less than a hundredth of a second, where they are digested. Bladderworts are particularly popular for their flowers, which can be as colourful and as beautiful as those of orchids.

Bladderwort flowers: Utricularia alpina, Utricularia quelchii, Utricularia reniformis. Courtesy of the ICPS.
Bladderwort flowers: Utricularia alpina, Utricularia quelchii, Utricularia reniformis. Courtesy of the ICPS.

This list is far from exhaustive! There are dozens of other carnivorous and semi-carnivorous plant species out there, but you’re less likely to encounter them as a beginner. They include the Waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda), the Rainbow plant (Byblis), the Corkscrew plant (Genlisea), and the Dewy Pines (Drosophyllum).

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2. Which carnivorous plants are good for beginners?

For first-time growers, I recommend the following easy-to-grow species:

  1. Drosera capensis, the Cape sundew: one of the prettiest and most entertaining sundews, this species is also one of the most adaptable. A great fly catcher and a perfect plant for new growers.
  2. Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap: Not quite as easy to care for as the Cape sundew, but just as awe-inspiring and rewarding to grow.
  3. Sarracenia purpurea, the Purple pitcher plant: This species - and hybrids involving it - is the most tolerant of all North American pitcher plants. It’s also smaller than the erect species, and its squat pitchers make it suitable for windowsill growing.
Carnivorous plants for beginners, from left to right: Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, and Sarracenia purpurea. Courtesy of the ICPS.
Carnivorous plants for beginners, from left to right: Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, and Sarracenia purpurea. Courtesy of the ICPS.

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3. How do I care for my Venus flytrap, Cape Sundew, or Purple Pitcher Plant?

These beginner’s plants share very similar growing requirements.

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4. Where can I find detailed care instructions?

The best single resource for growers of carnivorous plants is Peter D’Amato’s book The Savage Garden. Peter updated the book in 2013, so be sure to buy the second edition (here on Amazon).

Other recent books which I personally find useful and would recommend include Cultivating Carnivorous Plants by Natch Greyes (link) and Carnivorous Plants: Gardening with Extraordinary Botanicals by Nigel Hewitt-Cooper (link).

My top recommendations for books on carnivorous plants.
My top recommendations for books on carnivorous plants.

Alternatively, if you’re looking for online resources, consult the list below. For each genera, I’ve linked to (what I consider to be) good growing resources.

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5. Where can I buy carnivorous plants?

Plants purchased from specialist carnivorous plant nurseries will typically be much healthier than those from garden centers or department stores. You’ll also get much better advice on successful growing.

In no particular order, here are the UK-based nurseries that I have either purchased from myself, or which numerous readers have gotten in touch to recommend:

  1. Hampshire Carnivorous Plants: Matt Soper offers one of the widest ranges of carnivorous plants in the UK. He sells all major genera, has won dozens of medals for his exhibits at national flower shows, and offers a friendly and efficient mail order service. www.hantsflytrap.com.

  2. Wack’s Wicked Plants: Based in North Yorkshire, Peter Walker (Wack) and his wife Helleentje offer a wide range of carnivorous plants via mail order, and also put on medal-winning displays at many of the major UK flower shows. www.wackswickedplants.co.uk

  3. Scotland Carnivorous Plants: Based in Dollar, Oliver Murray offers a fantastic selection of Nepenthes, including some highly sought-after species and hybrids. He does not yet have a website, but you can view his current plant list here. To place an order, simply contact him via email.

  4. Little Shop of Horrors: Based in Devon and run by Alistair & Jenny Pearce, this is the online store of Southwest Carnivorous Plants. They specialise in hardy carnivorous plants including Venus flytraps, Sundews, and North American Pitcher Plants. www.littleshopofhorrors.co.uk.

  5. Triffid Nurseries: Based in Suffolk, Triffid offer a variety of plants via mail order, but are particularly well known for their excellent seed offering: they have well over 250 different species, hybrids, clones, and varieties in stock. www.triffidnurseries.co.uk

If you’d like to recommend a seller, please get in touch with me via email.

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6. Where can I get carnivorous plant seeds?

For UK readers in particular, your best bet is to join the Carnivorous Plant Society - membership includes free access to the world’s leading carnivorous plant seed bank. Other good options include specialist carnivorous plant nurseries, other society-run seed banks, and exchanges on active carnivorous plant forums.

Sarracenia seeds of various species against a 1mm ruler, courtesy of the ICPS.
Sarracenia seeds of various species against a 1mm ruler, courtesy of the ICPS.

Be careful when buying carnivorous plants seeds: the online market is sadly flooded with fakes. I suggest you read of this guide to buying seeds without getting scammed, and only buy from reputable sources.

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7. Where can I get purified water?

Pure water is essential for healthy carnivorous plants. This is probably the biggest pain point for new growers.

Most tap water and bottled water is high in dissolved minerals, and the gradual build up of these minerals in the soil will cause your plants to become sickly. You need water which is low in Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), such as rainwater or distilled water. TDS is typically measured in parts per million (ppm), and most carnivorous plants require under 100 ppm (and ideally much lower) for healthy growth.

So, as a new carnivorous plant grower, what can you do?

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8. Which carnivorous plant blogs and forums should I follow?

This one!

If you are enjoying this article and want to stay up-to-date, you can subscribe to Tom’s Carnivores via email - you’ll receive a notification whenever I publish new content on my blog. I usually write one or two articles a month, and you can unsubscribe with one click at any time.

Blogs

Forums

Instagram

There is a thriving carnivorous plant scene on Instagram. It’s obviously geared around photos rather than discussion, but many growers share stunning pictures of their collections and setups, making it well worth joining. Check out who I follow to get started.

Nepenthes robcantleyi at Kew Gardens #carnivorousplant #nepenthes #robcantleyi #kewgardens #kew #carnivorousplants #carnivore #monkeycup #pitcherplant

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Thanks for reading! Feel free to get in touch via email if you’ve got any questions, comments, or requests.

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